Tippi MacKenzie, M.D.

Associate Professor of Surgery
Division of Pediatric Surgery

1-800-793-3887 Office
415-502-0660 Fax
fetus@surgery.ucsf.edu

Curriculum Vitae

  • 1987-91, Harvard University, B.A., Biochemistry
  • 1992-97, Stanford University School of Medicine, M.D., Medicine
  • 1998-99, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Resident, Surgery
  • 2002-04, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Resident, Surgery
  • 2004-05, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Chief Resident, Surgery
  • 1999-02, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Fellow, Fetal Therapy
  • 2005-07, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Fellow, Pediatric Surgery
  • American Board of Surgery, 2006
  • Pediatric Surgery
  • Biomedical Sciences Program
  • Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regeneration Medicine and Stem Cell Research
  • Advanced Laparoscopy
  • Birth Defects
  • Endocrine and Biliary Surgery
  • Fetal Surgery
  • Pediatric Surgery
  • In-Utero Stem Cell Transplantation

Biography

Dr. Tippi MacKenzie is an Associate Professor of Surgery at the UCSF Division of Pediatric Surgery and the Fetal Treatment Center. Dr. MacKenzie obtained her undergraduate degree in Biochemistry at Harvard, then came to the Bay Area for medical school at Stanford. She did her surgical residency at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. During this time, she took three years to do research on fetal surgery and in utero stem cell transplantation at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Following residency, she returned to CHOP for her clinical pediatric surgery fellowship.

Dr MacKenzie's clinical interests include fetal surgery, advanced laparoscopy, and endocrine and biliary surgery. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u4SSynqQ1i0

Dr. MacKenzie has an active laboratory and is a member of the Biomedical Sciences Program and the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regeneration Medicine and Stem Cell Research. Her research focus is on mechanisms of tolerance induction following in utero stem cell transplantation  and the pathophysiology of prenatally diagnosed diseases, such as congenital diaphragmatic hernia and gastroschisis, to identify biomarkers that predict prognosis and molecular pathways that may be targets for prenatal intervention.